wilwheaton
Over the past few weeks, there have been repeated calls to “take gaming back” from the “white knights”, the SJWs, the liberal “crusaders”. But calling for better gender representation in games and game development isn’t about taking anything away. As an artform, as an industry, as a sport and as countless other things, gaming is growing at the speed of light. Yes, the traditional, “triple-A” boxed game business appears to be in decline, but that’s a poor yardstick for a medium that now encompasses hundreds, thousands of different devices, access points, genres and tastes. Such growth invites, demands and can only benefit from a more diverse and inclusive spread of creators and concepts. This is a question of evolution. It’s about taking what we have into tomorrow. Nobody needs to be excluded. And there is no need to panic.

OXM US Blog: Who’s afraid of women in games? (Page 2) - OXM US

I wonder if the decline of AAA titles has something to do with the vast majority of them being derivative of each other, and gamers are getting tired of the same old thing with marginally different graphics? I wonder if people are growing up and getting tired of dealing with assholes when they try to play these AAA titles online?

Women playing games isn’t the problem. The way some men treat women who play games is.

(via wilwheaton)
scienceisbeauty
scienceisbeauty:

Today marks the 45 anniversary. Astronaut Buzz Aldrin, lunar module pilot of the first lunar landing mission, poses for a photograph beside the deployed United States flag during an Apollo 11 Extravehicular Activity (EVA) on the lunar surface. The Lunar Module (LM) is on the left, and the footprints of the astronauts are clearly visible in the soil of the Moon. Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander, took this picture with a 70mm Hasselblad lunar surface camera. While astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin descended in the LM, the “Eagle”, to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the Moon, astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) “Columbia” in lunar-orbit.
Credit: NASA
Source: Apollo 11: Buzz Aldrin and the U.S. flag on the Moon (Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum)

scienceisbeauty:

Today marks the 45 anniversary. Astronaut Buzz Aldrin, lunar module pilot of the first lunar landing mission, poses for a photograph beside the deployed United States flag during an Apollo 11 Extravehicular Activity (EVA) on the lunar surface. The Lunar Module (LM) is on the left, and the footprints of the astronauts are clearly visible in the soil of the Moon. Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander, took this picture with a 70mm Hasselblad lunar surface camera. While astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin descended in the LM, the “Eagle”, to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the Moon, astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) “Columbia” in lunar-orbit.

Credit: NASA

Source: Apollo 11: Buzz Aldrin and the U.S. flag on the Moon (Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum)